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Woman claims exploding Samsung phone set hair on fire as she slept

A woman described her horror after claiming that her Samsung smartphone burst into flames setting her hair on fire as she slept.

Shocked Kyomi Kershaw, 23, from Wakefield, West Yorkshire, awoke at 4.30am to find her hair ablaze and her bedside cabinet, bedding and pillow alight.

She claims that her brand new Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra, which was not on charge at the time, had exploded into flames.

Care worker Kyomi was with partner Jon Hibbert, at their home in when the blaze started on Monday morning last week, and they immediately called the fire brigade.

Kyomi Kershaw, pictured, from Lupset, Wakefield, awoke at 4.30am to find her hair ablaze and her bedside cabinet, bedding and pillow alight

She claims that her brand new Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra, pictured, which was not on charge at the time, had exploded into flames

She claims that her brand new Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra, pictured, which was not on charge at the time, had exploded into flames

Kyomi who hurt her hands while dealing with the fire, was also taken to hospital where she was treated for second-degree burns.

She shared her nightmare on Facebook and says she is in touch with tech giant Samsung to seek compensation for the damage which she claimed was caused by the phone.

She wrote: ‘What a f**king morning, woke up at 4.30, My hair was on fire, cabinet and pillow.

‘Shouted Jon. We got the fire to stop within 30 minutes. ‘DONT GET THE NEW SAMSUNG S22 Ultra. Burnt my f**king hands. COULD OF BEEN A LOT WORSE IF I DIDN’T HAVE WOKEN UP….. (NO IT WASN’T EVEN ON CHARGE).’

The 23-year-old shared photos of the burned bedside cabinet, pictured, in the aftermath of the incident

The 23-year-old shared photos of the burned bedside cabinet, pictured, in the aftermath of the incident

She shared her nightmare on Facebook, pictured, and says she is in touch with tech giant Samsung to seek compensation for the damage, which she claims was caused by the phone

She shared her nightmare on Facebook, pictured, and says she is in touch with tech giant Samsung to seek compensation for the damage, which she claims was caused by the phone

Kyomi's charred phone, pictured, after the fire at her home

Care worker Kyomi was with partner Jon Hibbert, when the blaze started on Monday morning and they immediately called the fire brigade, pictured are her bedside cabinet, bedding, pillow and phone charred after the inferno

Kyomi said she was shaken by the incident and shared several photos of the melted Samsung handset and burned bedding and cabinet. She added: ‘Now (not) even two weeks old Samsung Galaxy S22 Ulltra (sic) was in flames.

‘Luckily we managed to put the fire out. The fire brigade attended to get rid of the smoke. I’ve got second degree burns.’

Concerned friends and family asked Kyomi if she was ok and sent her their best wishes.

Kyomi replied: ‘I am a bit shook up by it and the fact if I didn’t hear my hair burning then I wouldn’t of woken up. Samsung have a lot to pay for.’

The 23-year-old had to go to hospital for treatment for second degree burns, pictured, on her hands

The 23-year-old had to go to hospital for treatment for second degree burns, pictured, on her hands

Concerned friends and family asked Kyomi if she was ok after the fire in her bedroom which she claimed was caused by her new phone, pictured

Concerned friends and family asked Kyomi if she was ok after the fire in her bedroom which she claimed was caused by her new phone, pictured

She later added after her hospital visit: ‘Thanks everyone, had to go to the burns unit at pinders, for my hands luckily only two fingers needed medication attention and one finger X-ray to make sure there was nothing stuck in it.’

A West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue spokesperson said: ‘We were called to reports of a fire at a property on Gargave Place in Wakefield at 04.35 on 2nd May.

‘One crew from Ossett attended but the fire was already extinguished.’

A spokesperson for Samsung said: ‘Samsung takes customer safety extremely seriously. We have been in regular contact with the customer and following analysis of the device by our quality assurance team, we have concluded that the reported damage was the result of an external heat source and not from the device itself.’

Samsung has faced controversy in the past after it had to recall 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7 handsets after they exploded.

A viral clip was posted on YouTube by Ariel Gonzalez and showed a handset which reportedly caught fire after its charger was unplugged.

The 23-year-old later said that she needed medical attention on two of her fingers after the phone blaze, pictured is the charred mobile afterwards

The fire brigade were called when the incident happened and the blaze also charred Kyomi's bedding, pictured

The 23-year-old later said that she needed medical attention on two of her fingers after the phone blaze, pictured is the charred mobile afterwards

In the video, captured in an unknown location, Mr Gonzalez displayed a melted Galaxy Note 7 which he said was around two-weeks old.

‘I came home after work, put it to charge for a little bit before a hard class. I went to put it on my waste and it caught fire,’ he says.

Mr Gonzalez said he was using the official Samsung charger.

Other customer reports of scorched phones prompted Samsung to conduct extra quality controlling tests and delay shipments of the Note 7s before the recall.

A viral clip was posted on YouTube by Ariel Gonzalez in 2016 and showed a Galaxy Note 7 handset, pictured, which reportedly caught fire after its charger was unplugged

A viral clip was posted on YouTube by Ariel Gonzalez in 2016 and showed a Galaxy Note 7 handset, pictured, which reportedly caught fire after its charger was unplugged

And another charred Galaxy Note 7, pictured, caught fire in October 2016 in Richmond, Virginia

And another charred Galaxy Note 7, pictured, caught fire in October 2016 in Richmond, Virginia

South Korean high school teacher Park Soo-Jung said she had rushed to buy the new phone, pre-ordering and then activating it on August 19, 2016, its official launch date.

The 34-year-old living in the port city of Busan said that she was bruised when she rushed out of bed after her phone burst into flames, filling her bedroom with smoke stinking of chemicals.

Samsung found that a battery cell made by one of its two battery suppliers caused the phone to catch fire.

This further photo, pictured, shows a customer's charred replacement Samsung Galaxy Note 7 in Farmington, Minnesota

This further photo, pictured, shows a customer’s charred replacement Samsung Galaxy Note 7 in Farmington, Minnesota

The company refused to name the supplier.

‘There was a tiny problem in the manufacturing process, so it was very difficult to figure out,’ Koh Dong-jin, president of Samsung’s mobile business told reporters at a news conference.

‘It will cost us so much it makes my heart ache. However, the reason we made this decision is because what is most important is customer safety.’

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